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The Importance of Friction in Your Bolted Joint: Part 2

When doing research for your bolted joint it is important to understand the coefficient of friction of the finish of the fastener. There are many different options for coatings that will give you different ranges in values. Typically, those values are tested to a certain specification. Whether it’s an OEM specification, or per the ISO 16047 standard, each one can have minor differences (if you have questions on standards reach out to a Bossard engineer). So what do those values actually mean and how are they relevant to your joint?

Most of the testing that is done to validate the values of the coating is done on M10 surrogate bolts with a standard hex head cap screw. They are tested in lab conditions with either a plain finish washer or nut that is cleaned and degreased or with different variations done in a lab setting. The cause for concern is using those values in your joint. The values can change depending on your bearing surface and your mating threads (material, surface condition, lubrication, bearing surface area, etc.). As stated in previous Proven Productivity blog posts, it’s important to understand the relationship so you prevent costly errors down the road.

That is why we at Bossard always recommend doing bolted joint testing. We have the capability to perform joint testing so we can help you better understand the coefficient of friction and the torque tension relationship in your joints. We can perform testing onsite at your facility or you can visit one of our engineering design centers.

Contact us at ProvenProductivity@bossard.com for more information.

 

Jon Dabney
Application Engineer
Jdabney@bossard.com

October 13, 2017
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Why You Should Respect Your Fasteners

Take a minute to think of some of the most amazing mechanical marvels we have today: electric vehicles, exo-skeletons, cell phones, wind turbines, and many more. What do most of them have in common? They are all held together with some type of fasteners.

Now think about your product. What happens if the fasteners fail during use? At best, the customer is not happy and may look at other brands for their next purchase. At worst, damage to property or personal injury could result.

So, why are fasteners always the last thing we think about in our design? It’s true that assembly is the last step in the product design process, but fastener selection should be carefully considered in the early product design stages to ensure the best and safest product. Early fastener selection is also associated with time and cost savings making your process more lean and efficient.

Not sure what is the best choice? Have questions about what’s readily available or what’s new in fastener technology? Contact your fastening solutions provider to help you select the best hardware for your project. Don’t wait until two weeks before production starts!

Contact ProvenProductivity@bossard.com for information about the latest and greatest hardware innovations, and get help with your next project!

Doug Jones
Applications Engineer
djones@bossard.com

October 06, 2017
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A Complete Guide to European Standards

Standardization in the fastener industry is a necessity. Without fastener standards, there would be inconsistency and inefficiency. Because of fastener standards, engineers and consumers alike know exactly what to expect.

Because of the consistency that comes along with standards, international business and trade becomes much easier. Companies can purchase products from around the world and can rest easy knowing that the product will fit in their application. There are many organizations that create fastener standards; one of these organizations is the European Committee for Standardization.

In 1991, the European Committee for Standardization, also known as CEN, began working on the standardization of the fastener industry intended to be applicable throughout Europe. International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standards are adopted as European (EN) standards wherever possible. However, new EN standards are established when the ISO standards are not deemed suitable.

German Institute for Standardization (DIN) standards are being replaced by EN or ISO standards. In the future, DIN standards will apply only to products for which no ISO or EN standard exists.

DIN EN ISO plus a number (e.g. DIN EN ISO 4027) would indicate that a combination of all three standards are acceptable.

DIN ISO plus a number (e.g. DIN ISO 7049) indicates an ISO standard that is an adopted unchanged DIN standard.

Standards can sometimes be confusing. If you have any questions about fastener standardization, let us know by reaching out to us at ProvenProductivity@bossard.com.

 

Joe Stephan
Application Engineering
jstephan@bossard.com

September 29, 2017
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Why Quality Fasteners are Worth It

You’ve spent months on your design doing careful analysis and selecting the right materials. You are finally getting close to production – but wait, you haven’t selected a fastener supplier yet. You need mostly standard fasteners, except for those few specialty print parts. It’s just fasteners; how hard can it be?

The next step is to turn over your fastener list to the buyer and have them find the cheapest hardware they can negotiate to save a few pennies on the product. After all, it doesn’t matter where they come from. All fasteners are the same, right?

This scenario may be a bit harsh, but is all too often true. If manufacturers are making standard fasteners, they should be using the same fastener standards. Unfortunately, some manufacturers take short cuts to keep costs down in this highly competitive market. Some low-cost providers may make perfectly good fasteners 90% of the time, but is 90% good enough for your design? Assembly issues, failures in the field, warranty claims costs, and poor customer satisfaction when a new widget breaks or doesn’t perform as advertised can be very expensive and time consuming.

My advice is this: know where your fasteners are coming from. Here are some questions you can ask yourself before selecting a supplier:

  • Does the manufacturer have good process controls?
  • Are they tracking reject rates both internally and externally?
  • Are they subcontracting fastener finishes or heat treatment?
  • Do the subcontractors have good process controls?

Contact us through ProvenProductivity@bossard.com and see what steps we take to ensure good quality fasteners.

Doug Jones
Applications Engineer
djones@bossard.com

 

September 22, 2017
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