Fabricated Metal Products

Become a Product Design Engineering Expert by Watching These 4 Videos

Become a Product Design Expert by Watching These 4 Videos

As a mechanical engineer, you strive to design and create a safe and effective product at the lowest possible cost. To help you do just that, Bossard offers several innovative solutions and technical resources. In addition to offering tailored fastening solutions, we also provide our clients with in-depth education and learning opportunities. Let’s take a closer look at four educational videos designed to help you become a better product design engineer and expert.

Expert Education

At Bossard, we are proud to share our extensive knowledge about product engineering and fasteners in our Expert Education courses and seminars.

These tailor-made training sessions are designed to answer a range of questions, such as:

  • Can you answer with certainty that the right tightening torque is currently being applied to your application’s bolts?
  • Is the preload in the fastening joints enough to withstand external forces?
  • Will the fastening joint be secure over the lifetime of the product?
  • How many times will an existing bolt be reused while maintaining the application?

In the end, the Expert Education e-learning module can help slash your total cost of production by up to 40%. This robust learning portal will help you develop in-depth knowledge about engineering principles, applications, fasteners, and assembly technology, and more. Through Expert Education, you’ll be empowered to quickly make fastener design decisions and expedite the mechanical design and production process in your organization.

Watch the initial Expert Education video to learn more.

Expert Assortment Analysis

The Expert Assortment Analysis is a cutting-edge process designed to save your firm time and money. This innovative solution is designed to create efficiencies by addressing concerns, such as:

  • Do you suspect you’re utilizing countless C-parts and have lost the overview?
  • Do you believe that your collection of fasteners includes unnecessary or redundant variations and elements?
  • Are you wondering about the potential cost and time savings that could’ve been gained if your C-parts would’ve been streamlined?

Through our Expert Assortment Analysis, we’ll help you eliminate unnecessary elements. We’ll look for similarities where substitutions are possible. We’ll reduce complexities in purchasing, warehouses, and assembly. We’ll define your assortment to pick from and show you how significant your savings can be.

Ready to learn more? Watch the foundational Expert Assortment Analysis video for more on how it works.

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Fasteners

Have you ever experienced a broken screw in one of your products? Unexpected failures of fasteners cause damages and high costs. One of the top reasons is hydrogen embrittlement.

Also known as hydrogen attack, hydrogen embrittlement is a process where the metal becomes brittle or fractures over the exposure of and diffusion of hydrogen through the metal. As you can imagine, hydrogen embrittlement is a very serious matter and can pose monumental problems to your product if overlooked. Fortunately, the team at Bossard Can help.

Watch our recent video that explains the ins and outs of hydrogen embrittlement of fasteners.

Expert Teardown

Sometimes you must work backward to see a product in a new light. And at Bossard, we offer an exceptional Expert Teardown service where will strategically disassemble your product into its single fasteners and parts. Carefully analyzing the interface complexity, our product engineers will examine every square inch to best find cost-saving potential, understand functionality, and discover reliability improvements.

Learn more about Bossard’s Expert Tear down and how it works.

 

 

EMAIL US

 

 

NEXT UP

Where to Find Hidden Cost Savings in Your Design and Assembly

How to Cost Efficiently Design a Bolted Joint

Smart Factory Logistics – Last Mile Management

October 22, 2021
Read More

2 Solutions for Fastening in Lightweight Applications

2 Solutions for Fastening in Lightweight Applications

In 2018, original equipment manufacturers want to create the most innovative and unique products, all while making sure they are as lightweight as possible. Whether its vehicles or electronics, they are all becoming less bulky and less heavy.

To produce these lightweight products, manufacturers are using different materials than what might have been used just a few years ago. Composites like carbon fiber and fiber glass are the new normal when it comes to materials. Metals like aluminum and magnesium are also becoming more popular. But assembling these products can prove to be challenging.

Fortunately, Bossard has a variety of solutions for how design engineers can use fasteners safely and effectively in these relatively new materials. Here are two of our most popular fasteners for these applications.

bigHead

bigHead is one of the best options for fastening when using composite materials. They consist of a standard fixing welded onto a head. These unique fasteners can be secured via adhesives or by embedding directly into the material. They can be used with carbon fiber, steel, stainless, and more materials.

ecosyn-BCT

ecosyn-BCT is not your typical rivet nut. What makes these blind rivet nuts different from others is that they are designed with strategically placed holes around the body of the nut where the rivet nut body will begin to collapse, controlling where the bulge happens. Hence, BCT – bulge control technology. ecosyn-BCT is also great for aluminum, stainless steel, and other lightweight materials

There are four main types of ecosyn-BCT: bulge control, micro, high strength, and multigrip.

For more information about fastening with lightweight materials, contact us at ProvenProductivity@bossard.com.

June 29, 2018
Read More

3 Solutions for Nylon Insert Nut Challenges

Challenges with Nylon Insert Nuts

If you use nylon insert lock nuts in production, it is more than likely that you have run into some issues like the ones pictured below:

Nylon Insert Nut 1 Nylon Insert Nut 2 Nylon Insert Nut 3

Causes

Why does this happen, and usually only in January through March?

The inserts are made of 66 nylon which is hydroscopic, meaning it can absorb moisture up to 8% of its weight. When exposed to temperature extremes and low humidity, the nylon will lose moisture and can shrink slightly and in some cases become brittle. These conditions are not relevant once the insert is installed, but if the nylon has become too dry prior to assembly, then we can see problems like those pictured above.

Certain assembly conditions can contribute to failure of a dried out insert, such as:
• Poor or no chamfer on mating threads
• Long thread engagement
• High assembly speed
• Any combination of the above conditions

If the insert is very dry and brittle, and the mating thread has a poor chamfer, we can see breaking of the nylon, especially if the assembly speed is very fast as with an impact gun.

Long thread engagements coupled with high speeds seem to heat-up the dried out nylon enough to cause it to extrude out the top of the nut. This can happen with properly hydrated nylon as well, especially if the pitch diameter of the mating thread is at the upper end of tolerance (the nylon has to go someplace) but it seems to happen more when the nylon is dried out.

In extreme cases of dried out inserts, such as those run through a bake oven for some type of post finish (zinc flake for example), the inserts may spin freely in their cavity prior to installation. When the mating part is introduced, some inserts may be pushed out of the nut without even forming threads into the nylon ring.

Solutions

  1. Packaging/environment
  • Wherever possible, keep nuts sealed in their original containers until they are ready to be consumed.
  • Do not store more nuts than needed in extreme cold and/or dry environments.
  1. Assembly
  • Check for chamfers on mating parts – a smooth entry into the nylon will lessen potential problems.
  • Avoid long thread engagement if possible.
    • If not possible, adjust speed down to lessen heat build-up.
  • Check speed of assembly – try slowing down the speed if problems occur.
  1. Additional Insert Material
  • If these solutions do not resolve the issues, then consider another type of insert material.
  • High temperature materials are available that are not as sensitive to environment.

For questions, please contact our Engineering team at ProvenProductivity@Bossard.com.

For more shopping options click here.

Doug Jones
Applications Engineer
djones@bossard.com

June 22, 2018
Read More

Self-Tapping Screws: How They Work and How to Use Them

what are self tapping screws

When looking for fastening solutions, one common solution to use for routinely maintained products is self-tapping screws. What is a self tapping screw? Self-tapping screws are fasteners that are designed to drill their own hole as they are screwed into wood, plastic or metal. By using a screw driver and self-tapping screws, precisely fitted threads are created. Self-tapping screws are ideal for items that require regular maintenance and work well when working with two different kinds of material being fastened together. (more…)

August 06, 2014
Read More